Building Regulations, SAP & SBEM

Heat Pumps and Building Regulations Part L

The Building Regulations set out requirements for specific aspects of building design and construction. The building regulations states that “Where a building is erected, it shall not exceed the target CO2 emission rate for the building…”.

Part L of the Building Regulations then goes on to state that provision for conservation of fuel and power shall be made by limiting heat gain and losses and providing building services which are efficient, have effective controls and are properly commissioned and that information is provided so that the building can be operated efficiently.

Heat Pumps and SAP

The Government's Standard Assessment Produce ("SAP") is the methodology used to calculate the emission rate from buildings. The Government has set targets that new buildings must achieve, and the minimum standard are stated within Part L. 

For any given property, a Target Emission Rate ("TER") is established. This is the emission rate for a notional dwelling of identical dimensions to that which is being built, based on the minimum requirements stated within Part L. The actual emission rate of the building called the Dwelling Emission Rate ("DER") must be lower than the TER. In order to achieve this, developers must specify building materials and technologies that reduce carbon dioxide emissions from the property.

The Effect of Heat Pumps in sap

One of the biggest contributors to the CO2 emissions for a property is the heating system installed in the property.

Heat Pumps currently deliver up to 4 units of heat output of every 1 unit of electrical input, meaning they are by far the most efficient way to utilise electrical energy to produce heat, and as more low and zero carbon technologies are used to generate our electricity, the carbon emissions from Heat Pumps will decrease even further as they play an increasingly crucial role in our nation’s low carbon future.

Heat Pumps & SAp Appendix Q

Not all heat pumps are created equal. SAP sets out benchmark efficiencies that can be used for ground source heat pumps and air source heat pumps. However, certain heat pump manufacturers' heat pumps are listed within the SAP Appendix Q Database.

Heat pumps listed within this database are allowed to use their specific performance figures, as opposed to the generic performance figures stipulated with the main body of the SAP calculation. This provides a further reduction in the CO2 emission rate for the building. All of the ground source heat pumps and air source heat pumps supplied by Alto Energy are listed with the SAP Appendix Q Database, ensuring that the CO2 emissions reduction achieved by our heat pumps is optimised.


CHOOSE HEAT PUMPS FOR YOUR NEW BUILD PROJECT

By choosing heat pumps for your project, you make compliance with the Building Regulations that bit easier.


Heat Pumps and SBEM

As with residential premises, the Building Regulations also set out requirements for specific aspects of building design and construction for non-residential buildings. These requirements are set out within Part L2 of the Building Regulations.

Similarly to residential premises, the basic principle involves using standard data sets to calculate the annual energy use of a proposed building and comparing it with the energy use of a 'notional' building of a similar type, under similar circumstances. This is done by calculating the Target Emission Rate ("TER") and comparing this with the Building Emission Rate ("BER") for the proposed building. The BER must not be higher than the TER. In order to achieve this, developers must specify building materials and technologies that reduce carbon dioxide emissions from the building.

Compliance with the Building Regulations can be demonstrated by using the Simplified Building Energy Model (SBEM), a computer programme developed by the Building Research Establishment, BRE. Please note that SBEM is a 'simplified' compliance tool, rather than a design tool.

The Effect of Heat Pumps IN SBEM

SBEM calculates monthly energy use and carbon dioxide emissions, given a description of the building which is entered through its user interface. The results are based on:

  • Building type
  • Building geometry
  • Construction
  • Use
  • Heating, ventilation and air-conditioning (HVAC)
  • Lighting equipment

Depending on the overall use of the building, the selection of heating equipment is going to have a significant impact on the energy requirements and subsequent CO2 emissions from the building.

Heat Pumps currently deliver up to 4 units of heat output of every 1 unit of electrical input, meaning they are by far the most efficient way to utilise electrical energy to produce heat, and as more low and zero carbon technologies are used to generate our electricity, the carbon emissions from Heat Pumps will decrease even further as they play an increasingly crucial role in our nation’s low carbon future.


CHOOSE HEAT PUMPS FOR YOUR COMMERCIAL DEVELOPMENT